sys-unconfig: Reconfiguring network settings on a Solaris box

Posted by lvance in Solaris

This command will unconfig a solaris box back to its original state. It takes you back to the original setup for the network settings for the box. You will be prompted for the ip address, default route, etc just as if you were re-installing the operating system.


Command:
#sys-unconfig

Output:
/# sys-unconfig
WARNING

This program will unconfigure your system. It will cause it
to revert to a “blank” system – it will not have a name or know
about other systems or networks.

This program will also halt the system.

Do you want to continue (y/n) ? n

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4 Responses to “sys-unconfig: Reconfiguring network settings on a Solaris box”

  1. November 15, 2009 at 7:18 pm, Name said:

    I came here by accident. But why doing sys-unconfig only to reset the network
    configuration? On Solaris up to 10 and Nevada you simply need to edit the files
    /etc/defaultrouter, /etc/nsswitch.conf, /etc/resolv.conf and /etc/hostname.
    as well as setting up the correct hostname in /etc/inet/hosts and not to forget
    /etc/nodename. But you do not loose the whole rest of the config as would be
    when running sys-unconfig.
    OpneSolaris runs similar, but remember /etc/dladm/* if running nwam.

    Reply

  2. March 09, 2011 at 3:54 pm, Joe said:

    don’t forget /etc/dumpadm.conf

    Reply

    • April 12, 2011 at 2:48 pm, Kevinmcs said:

      For exactly the reason you make so clear in your posts.
      You don’t have to remember each of those (8) files or the syntax that is required to edit them OR how to use the damn VI editor. You can just run the command and after a quick reboot you enter the info and poof! Your done. It also has the benefit to clear any unknown problems someone else before you might have caused.

      Reply

      • September 19, 2012 at 10:16 pm, Kevin said:

        >I’ve ran the sys-unconfig but not sure what option to take when presented with Service Name: NIS, NIS+, DNS, LDAP and none. Its just a straight forward client not doing anything special, which should I choose ? I wanted to change the ip address etc as moving to different range and ran into this. I took the option of DHCP and was expecting it to present me with a client name entry but a little stumped. If I choose NONE will I be able to change the name after ? How can I get to that file mentioned above.

        Reply

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